Pioneers in Neurophotonics: Special Section Honoring Professor Amiram Grinvald

Genetically expressed voltage sensor ArcLight for imaging large scale cortical activity in the anesthetized and awake mouse

[+] Author Affiliations
Peter Y. Borden, Alex D. Ortiz, Christian Waiblinger, Audrey J. Sederberg, Garrett B. Stanley

Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Atlanta, Georgia, United States

Arthur E. Morrissette, Dieter Jaeger

Emory University, Neuroscience Program, Department of Biology, Atlanta, Georgia, United States

Craig R. Forest

Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, School of Mechanical Engineering, Atlanta, Georgia, United States

Neurophoton. 4(3), 031212 (May 04, 2017). doi:10.1117/1.NPh.4.3.031212
History: Received January 18, 2017; Accepted April 10, 2017
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Abstract.  With the recent breakthrough in genetically expressed voltage indicators (GEVIs), there has been a tremendous demand to determine the capabilities of these sensors in vivo. Novel voltage sensitive fluorescent proteins allow for direct measurement of neuron membrane potential changes through changes in fluorescence. Here, we utilized ArcLight, a recently developed GEVI, and examined the functional characteristics in the widely used mouse somatosensory whisker pathway. We measured the resulting evoked fluorescence using a wide-field microscope and a CCD camera at 200 Hz, which enabled voltage recordings over the entire cortical region with high temporal resolution. We found that ArcLight produced a fluorescent response in the S1 barrel cortex during sensory stimulation at single whisker resolution. During wide-field cortical imaging, we encountered substantial hemodynamic noise that required additional post hoc processing through noise subtraction techniques. Over a period of 28 days, we found clear and consistent ArcLight fluorescence responses to a simple sensory input. Finally, we demonstrated the use of ArcLight to resolve cortical S1 sensory responses in the awake mouse. Taken together, our results demonstrate the feasibility of ArcLight as a measurement tool for mesoscopic, chronic imaging.

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© 2017 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Peter Y. Borden ; Alex D. Ortiz ; Christian Waiblinger ; Audrey J. Sederberg ; Arthur E. Morrissette, et al.
"Genetically expressed voltage sensor ArcLight for imaging large scale cortical activity in the anesthetized and awake mouse", Neurophoton. 4(3), 031212 (May 04, 2017). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.NPh.4.3.031212


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