Research Papers

Intraoperative video-rate hemodynamic response assessment in human cortex using snapshot hyperspectral optical imaging

[+] Author Affiliations
Julien Pichette, Audrey Laurence, Leticia Angulo

Polytechnique Montreal, Department of Engineering Physics, C.P. 6079, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal H3C3A7, Canada

Frederic Lesage

Polytechnique Montreal, Department of Electrical Engineering, C.P. 6079, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal H3C3A7, Canada

Alain Bouthillier

Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal, Notre-Dame Hospital, Division of Neurosurgery, 1560 Sherbrooke Street East, Montréal H2L4M1, Canada

Dang Khoa Nguyen

Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal, Notre-Dame Hospital, Division of Neurology, 1560 Sherbrooke Street East, Montréal H2L4M1, Canada

Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal, 900 Saint-Denis, Montréal H2X0A9, Canada

Frederic Leblond

Polytechnique Montreal, Department of Engineering Physics, C.P. 6079, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal H3C3A7, Canada

Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal, 900 Saint-Denis, Montréal H2X0A9, Canada

Neurophoton. 3(4), 045003 (Oct 12, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.NPh.3.4.045003
History: Received May 30, 2016; Accepted September 19, 2016
Text Size: A A A

Abstract.  Using light, we are able to visualize the hemodynamic behavior of the brain to better understand neurovascular coupling and cerebral metabolism. In vivo optical imaging of tissue using endogenous chromophores necessitates spectroscopic detection to ensure molecular specificity as well as sufficiently high imaging speed and signal-to-noise ratio, to allow dynamic physiological changes to be captured, isolated, and used as surrogate of pathophysiological processes. An optical imaging system is introduced using a 16-bands on-chip hyperspectral camera. Using this system, we show that up to three dyes can be imaged and quantified in a tissue phantom at video-rate through the optics of a surgical microscope. In vivo human patient data are presented demonstrating brain hemodynamic response can be measured intraoperatively with molecular specificity at high speed.

Figures in this Article
© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Julien Pichette ; Audrey Laurence ; Leticia Angulo ; Frederic Lesage ; Alain Bouthillier, et al.
"Intraoperative video-rate hemodynamic response assessment in human cortex using snapshot hyperspectral optical imaging", Neurophoton. 3(4), 045003 (Oct 12, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.NPh.3.4.045003


Tables

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.