Special Section on Brain Mapping and Therapeutics

Somatic stimulation causes frontoparietal cortical changes in neonates: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study

[+] Author Affiliations
Nasser H. Kashou

Wright State University, Biomedical, Industrial and Human Factors Engineering, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, Ohio 45435, United States

Irfaan A. Dar

Wright State University, Biomedical, Industrial and Human Factors Engineering, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, Ohio 45435, United States

The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Innovative Research Program in Neonatal and Infant Feeding Disorders, 700 Children's Drive, Columbus, Ohio 43205, United States

Kathryn A. Hasenstab

The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Innovative Research Program in Neonatal and Infant Feeding Disorders, 700 Children's Drive, Columbus, Ohio 43205, United States

Ramzi W. Nahhas

Wright State University, Department of Community Health, 3123 Research Boulevard, Kettering, Ohio 45420, United States

Wright State University, Department of Psychiatry, 3123 Research Boulevard, Kettering, Ohio 45420, United States

Sudarshan R. Jadcherla

The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Innovative Research Program in Neonatal and Infant Feeding Disorders, 700 Children's Drive, Columbus, Ohio 43205, United States

The Ohio State University, College of Medicine, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, 370 West 9th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210, United States

Neurophoton. 4(1), 011004 (Aug 17, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.NPh.4.1.011004
History: Received March 1, 2016; Accepted May 2, 2016
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Abstract.  Palmar and plantar grasp are the foremost primitive neonatal reflexes and functions. Persistence of these reflexes in infancy is a sign of evolving cerebral palsy. Our aims were to establish measurement feasibility in a clinical setting and to characterize changes in oxyhemoglobin (HbO) and deoxyhemoglobin (HbD) concentration in the bilateral frontoparietal cortex in unsedated neonates at the crib-side using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). We hypothesized that bilateral concentration changes will occur upon somatic central and peripheral somatic stimulation. Thirteen preterm neonates (five males) underwent time 1, and six (two males) returned for time 2 (mean PMA=41.6 and 47.0 weeks, respectively). Signals from a total of 162 somatic stimuli responses were measured. Response amplitude, duration, and latency were log-transformed and compared between palmar, plantar, and oromotor stimuli using linear mixed models, adjusted for cap, electroencephalogram abnormality, time (1 versus 2), and Sarnat score, if necessary. The oromotor stimulus resulted in a 50% greater response than the palmar or plantar stimuli for HbO left and right hemisphere duration (p<0.0001). There were no other statistically significant differences between stimuli for any other outcome (p>0.05). Utilizing fNIRS in conjunction with occupational and physical therapy maneuvers is efficacious to study modifiable and restorative neurophysiological mechanisms.

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© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Nasser H. Kashou ; Irfaan A. Dar ; Kathryn A. Hasenstab ; Ramzi W. Nahhas and Sudarshan R. Jadcherla
"Somatic stimulation causes frontoparietal cortical changes in neonates: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study", Neurophoton. 4(1), 011004 (Aug 17, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.NPh.4.1.011004


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