Special Section on Clinical Near-Infrared Spectroscopy and Imaging of the Brain

Hemodynamic response to burst-suppressed and discontinuous electroencephalography activity in infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

[+] Author Affiliations
Maria Chalia, Chuen Wai Lee, Andrea D. Edwards, Topun Austin

Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, The Rosie Hospital, The Evelyn Perinatal Imaging Centre, neoLAB, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, United Kingdom

Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, The Rosie Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, United Kingdom

Laura A. Dempsey, Harsimrat Singh, Nicholas L. Everdell, Jeremy C. Hebden, Robert J. Cooper

Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, The Rosie Hospital, The Evelyn Perinatal Imaging Centre, neoLAB, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, United Kingdom

University College London, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Malet Place Engineering Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom

Andrew W. Michell

Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, United Kingdom

Reuben W. Hill

University College London, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Malet Place Engineering Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom

Neurophoton. 3(3), 031408 (May 02, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.NPh.3.3.031408
History: Received December 30, 2015; Accepted March 23, 2016
Text Size: A A A

Abstract.  Burst suppression (BS) is an electroencephalographic state associated with a profound inactivation of the brain. BS and pathological discontinuous electroencephalography (EEG) are often observed in term-age infants with neurological injury and can be indicative of a poor outcome and lifelong disability. Little is known about the neurophysiological mechanisms of BS or how the condition relates to the functional state of the neonatal brain. We used simultaneous EEG and diffuse optical tomography (DOT) to investigate whether bursts of EEG activity in infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy are associated with an observable cerebral hemodynamic response. We were able to identify significant changes in concentration of both oxy and deoxyhemoglobin that are temporally correlated with EEG bursts and present a relatively consistent morphology across six infants. Furthermore, DOT reveals patient-specific spatial distributions of this hemodynamic response that may be indicative of a complex pattern of cortical activation underlying discontinuous EEG activity that is not readily apparent in scalp EEG.

Figures in this Article
© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Maria Chalia ; Chuen Wai Lee ; Laura A. Dempsey ; Andrea D. Edwards ; Harsimrat Singh, et al.
"Hemodynamic response to burst-suppressed and discontinuous electroencephalography activity in infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy", Neurophoton. 3(3), 031408 (May 02, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.NPh.3.3.031408


Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.