Research Papers

Transcranial low-level laser therapy (810 nm) temporarily inhibits peripheral nociception: photoneuromodulation of glutamate receptors, prostatic acid phophatase, and adenosine triphosphate

[+] Author Affiliations
Marcelo Victor Pires de Sousa

Massachusetts General Hospital, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, BAR414, 40 Blossom Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, United States

University of São Paulo, Institute of Physics, Laboratory of Radiation Dosimetry and Medical Physics, Rua do Matão, Travessa R, 187, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, Brazil

Bright Photomedicine Ltd., CIETEC Building, 2242 Lineu Prestes, São Paulo 05508-000, Brazil

Cleber Ferraresi

Massachusetts General Hospital, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, BAR414, 40 Blossom Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, United States

Federal University of São Carlos, Department of Physical Therapy, Laboratory of Electro-Thermo-Phototherapy, Street Washington Luis, km 235. Monjolinho, São Carlos, São Paulo 13565-905, Brazil

Federal University of São Carlos, Post-Graduation Program in Biotechnology, Street Washington Luis, km 235. Monjolinho, São Carlos, São Paulo 13560-000, Brazil

University of São Paulo, Optics Group, Physics Institute of São Carlos, Street Miguel Petroni, 146–Jardim Bandeirantes, São Carlos, São Paulo 13560-970, Brazil

Masayoshi Kawakubo

Massachusetts General Hospital, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, BAR414, 40 Blossom Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, United States

Beatriz Kaippert

Massachusetts General Hospital, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, BAR414, 40 Blossom Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, United States

Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Carlos Chagas Filho, 373–Cidade Universitária, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-170, Brazil

Elisabeth Mateus Yoshimura

University of São Paulo, Institute of Physics, Laboratory of Radiation Dosimetry and Medical Physics, Rua do Matão, Travessa R, 187, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, Brazil

Michael R. Hamblin

Massachusetts General Hospital, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, BAR414, 40 Blossom Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, United States

Harvard Medical School, Department of Dermatology, 50 Staniford Street #807, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, United States

Harvard-MIT, Division of Health Sciences and Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, E25-518, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, United States

Neurophoton. 3(1), 015003 (Jan 25, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.NPh.3.1.015003
History: Received August 26, 2015; Accepted December 9, 2015
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Abstract.  Photobiomodulation or low-level light therapy has been shown to attenuate both acute and chronic pain, but the mechanism of action is not well understood. In most cases, the light is applied to the painful area, but in the present study we applied light to the head. We found that transcranial laser therapy (TLT) applied to mouse head with specific parameters (810 nm laser, 300  mW/cm2, 7.2 or 36  J/cm2) decreased the reaction to pain in the foot evoked either by pressure (von Frey filaments), cold, or inflammation (formalin injection) or in the tail (evoked by heat). The pain threshold increasing is maximum around 2 h after TLT, remains up to 6 h, and is finished 24 h after TLT. The mechanisms were investigated by quantification of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), immunofluorescence, and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of brain tissues. TLT increased ATP and prostatic acid phosphatase (an endogenous analgesic) and reduced the amount of glutamate receptor (mediating a neurotransmitter responsible for conducting nociceptive information). There was no change in the concentration of tubulin, a constituent of the cytoskeleton, and the H&E staining revealed no tissue damage.

Figures in this Article
© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Marcelo Victor Pires de Sousa ; Cleber Ferraresi ; Masayoshi Kawakubo ; Beatriz Kaippert ; Elisabeth Mateus Yoshimura, et al.
"Transcranial low-level laser therapy (810 nm) temporarily inhibits peripheral nociception: photoneuromodulation of glutamate receptors, prostatic acid phophatase, and adenosine triphosphate", Neurophoton. 3(1), 015003 (Jan 25, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.NPh.3.1.015003


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