Research Papers

Hyperspectral optical tomography of intrinsic signals in the rat cortex

[+] Author Affiliations
Soren D. Konecky, Robert H. Wilson

University of California, Irvine, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, Laser Microbeam and Medical Program, 1002 Health Sciences Road, Irvine, California 92612, United States

Nathan Hagen, Tomasz S. Tkaczyk

Rice University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 6500 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77030, United States

Amaan Mazhar, Bruce J. Tromberg

University of California, Irvine, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, Laser Microbeam and Medical Program, 1002 Health Sciences Road, Irvine, California 92612, United States

University of California, Irvine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 5200 Engineering Hall, Irvine, California 92697, United States

Ron D. Frostig

University of California, Irvine, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, 2205 McGaugh Hall, Irvine, California 92697, United States

University of California, Irvine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 5200 Engineering Hall, Irvine, California 92697, United States

Neurophoton. 2(4), 045003 (Nov 12, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.NPh.2.4.045003
History: Received April 29, 2015; Accepted October 19, 2015
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Abstract.  We introduce a tomographic approach for three-dimensional imaging of evoked hemodynamic activity, using broadband illumination and diffuse optical tomography (DOT) image reconstruction. Changes in diffuse reflectance in the rat somatosensory cortex due to stimulation of a single whisker were imaged at a frame rate of 5 Hz using a hyperspectral image mapping spectrometer. In each frame, images in 38 wavelength bands from 484 to 652 nm were acquired simultaneously. For data analysis, we developed a hyperspectral DOT algorithm that used the Rytov approximation to quantify changes in tissue concentration of oxyhemoglobin (ctHbO2) and deoxyhemoglobin (ctHb) in three dimensions. Using this algorithm, the maximum changes in ctHbO2 and ctHb were found to occur at 0.29±0.02 and 0.66±0.04mm beneath the surface of the cortex, respectively. Rytov tomographic reconstructions revealed maximal spatially localized increases and decreases in ctHbO2 and ctHb of 321±53 and 555±96nM, respectively, with these maximum changes occurring at 4±0.2s poststimulus. The localized optical signals from the Rytov approximation were greater than those from modified Beer–Lambert, likely due in part to the inability of planar reflectance to account for partial volume effects.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Soren D. Konecky ; Robert H. Wilson ; Nathan Hagen ; Amaan Mazhar ; Tomasz S. Tkaczyk, et al.
"Hyperspectral optical tomography of intrinsic signals in the rat cortex", Neurophoton. 2(4), 045003 (Nov 12, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.NPh.2.4.045003


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