Research Papers

Differential pathlength factor informs evoked stimulus response in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

[+] Author Affiliations
Alexander J. Lin, Bruce J. Tromberg

University of California, Irvine, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, 1002 Health Sciences Road, Irvine, California 92612, United States

University of California, Irvine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 3120 Natural Sciences II, Irvine, California 92697-2715, United States

Adrien Ponticorvo, Anthony J. Durkin

University of California, Irvine, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, 1002 Health Sciences Road, Irvine, California 92612, United States

Vasan Venugopalan

University of California, Irvine, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, 1002 Health Sciences Road, Irvine, California 92612, United States

University of California, Irvine, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, 916 Engineering Tower, Irvine, California 92697-2575, United States

Bernard Choi

University of California, Irvine, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, 1002 Health Sciences Road, Irvine, California 92612, United States

University of California, Irvine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 3120 Natural Sciences II, Irvine, California 92697-2715, United States

University of California, Irvine, Edwards Lifesciences Center for Advanced Cardiovascular Technology, 2400 Engineering Hall, Irvine, California 92697-2730, United States

Neurophoton. 2(4), 045001 (Oct 12, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.NPh.2.4.045001
History: Received February 27, 2015; Accepted September 15, 2015
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Abstract.  Baseline optical properties are typically assumed in calculating the differential pathlength factor (DPF) of mouse brains, a value used in the modified Beer–Lambert law to characterize an evoked stimulus response. We used spatial frequency domain imaging to measure in vivo baseline optical properties in 20-month-old control (n=8) and triple transgenic APP/PS1/tau (3xTg-AD) (n=5) mouse brains. Average μa for control and 3xTg-AD mice was 0.82±0.05 and 0.65±0.05mm1, respectively, at 460 nm; and 0.71±0.04 and 0.55±0.04mm1, respectively, at 530 nm. Average μs for control and 3xTg-AD mice was 1.5±0.1 and 1.7±0.1mm1, respectively, at 460 nm; and 1.3±0.1 and 1.5±0.1mm1, respectively, at 530 nm. The calculated DPF for control and 3xTg-AD mice was 0.58±0.04 and 0.64±0.04 OD mm, respectively, at 460 nm; and 0.66±0.03 and 0.73±0.05 OD mm, respectively, at 530 nm. In hindpaw stimulation experiments, the hemodynamic increase in brain tissue concentration of oxyhemoglobin was threefold larger and two times longer in the control mice compared to 3xTg-AD mice. Furthermore, the washout of deoxyhemoglobin from increased brain perfusion was seven times larger in controls compared to 3xTg-AD mice (p<0.05).

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Alexander J. Lin ; Adrien Ponticorvo ; Anthony J. Durkin ; Vasan Venugopalan ; Bernard Choi, et al.
"Differential pathlength factor informs evoked stimulus response in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease", Neurophoton. 2(4), 045001 (Oct 12, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.NPh.2.4.045001


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