Research Papers

Coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during hypothermia in newborn piglets as measured by time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy: a pilot study

[+] Author Affiliations
Mohammad Fazel Bakhsheshi

Lawson Health Research Institute, Imaging Program, 268 Grosvenor Street, London, Ontario N6A 4V2, Canada

Robarts Research Institute, Imaging Research Laboratories, 1151 Richmond Street North, London, Ontario N6A 5B7, Canada

Mamadou Diop

Lawson Health Research Institute, Imaging Program, 268 Grosvenor Street, London, Ontario N6A 4V2, Canada

Western University, Department of Medical Biophysics, London, Ontario N6A 5C1, Canada

Laura B. Morrison

Lawson Health Research Institute, Imaging Program, 268 Grosvenor Street, London, Ontario N6A 4V2, Canada

Keith St. Lawrence

Lawson Health Research Institute, Imaging Program, 268 Grosvenor Street, London, Ontario N6A 4V2, Canada

Robarts Research Institute, Imaging Research Laboratories, 1151 Richmond Street North, London, Ontario N6A 5B7, Canada

Western University, Department of Medical Biophysics, London, Ontario N6A 5C1, Canada

Ting-Yim Lee

Lawson Health Research Institute, Imaging Program, 268 Grosvenor Street, London, Ontario N6A 4V2, Canada

Robarts Research Institute, Imaging Research Laboratories, 1151 Richmond Street North, London, Ontario N6A 5B7, Canada

Western University, Department of Medical Biophysics, London, Ontario N6A 5C1, Canada

Western University, Department of Medical Imaging, London, Ontario N6A 5W9, Canada

Neurophoton. 2(3), 035006 (Sep 21, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.NPh.2.3.035006
History: Received May 27, 2015; Accepted August 18, 2015
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Abstract.  Hypothermia (HT) is a potent neuroprotective therapy that is now widely used in following neurological emergencies, such as neonatal asphyxia. An important mechanism of HT-induced neuroprotection is attributed to the associated reduction in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). Since cerebral circulation and metabolism are tightly regulated, reduction in CMRO2 typically results in decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF); it is only under oxidative stress, e.g., hypoxia-ischemia, that oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) deviates from its basal value, which can lead to cerebral dysfunction. As such, it is critical to measure these key physiological parameters during therapeutic HT. This report investigates a noninvasive method of measuring the coupling of CMRO2 and CBF under HT and different anesthetic combinations of propofol/nitrous-oxide (N2O) that may be used in clinical practice. Both CBF and CMRO2 decreased with decreasing temperature, but the OEF remained unchanged, which indicates a tight coupling of flow and metabolism under different anesthetics and over the mild HT temperature range (38°C to 33°C).

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Mohammad Fazel Bakhsheshi ; Mamadou Diop ; Laura B. Morrison ; Keith St. Lawrence and Ting-Yim Lee
"Coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during hypothermia in newborn piglets as measured by time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy: a pilot study", Neurophoton. 2(3), 035006 (Sep 21, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.NPh.2.3.035006


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