Research Papers

Short separation regression improves statistical significance and better localizes the hemodynamic response obtained by near-infrared spectroscopy for tasks with differing autonomic responses

[+] Author Affiliations
Meryem A. Yücel, Juliette Selb, David A. Boas

Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, MGH/HST Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, United States

Christopher M. Aasted, Mike P. Petkov

Boston Children’s Hospital, Center for Pain and the Brain, Departments of Anaesthesia and Radiology, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, United States

Lino Becerra, David Borsook

Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, MGH/HST Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, United States

Boston Children’s Hospital, Center for Pain and the Brain, Departments of Anaesthesia and Radiology, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, United States

Harvard Medical School, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, United States

Neurophoton. 2(3), 035005 (Sep 11, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.NPh.2.3.035005
History: Received May 6, 2015; Accepted August 10, 2015
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Abstract.  Autonomic nervous system response is known to be highly task-dependent. The sensitivity of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements to superficial layers, particularly to the scalp, makes it highly susceptible to systemic physiological changes. Thus, one critical step in NIRS data processing is to remove the contribution of superficial layers to the NIRS signal and to obtain the actual brain response. This can be achieved using short separation channels that are sensitive only to the hemodynamics in the scalp. We investigated the contribution of hemodynamic fluctuations due to autonomous nervous system activation during various tasks. Our results provide clear demonstrations of the critical role of using short separation channels in NIRS measurements to disentangle differing autonomic responses from the brain activation signal of interest.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Meryem A. Yücel ; Juliette Selb ; Christopher M. Aasted ; Mike P. Petkov ; Lino Becerra, et al.
"Short separation regression improves statistical significance and better localizes the hemodynamic response obtained by near-infrared spectroscopy for tasks with differing autonomic responses", Neurophoton. 2(3), 035005 (Sep 11, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.NPh.2.3.035005


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