Research Papers

Pressure modulation algorithm to separate cerebral hemodynamic signals from extracerebral artifacts

[+] Author Affiliations
Wesley B. Baker, Ashwin B. Parthasarathy, Tiffany S. Ko, Kenneth Abramson, Arjun G. Yodh

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 3231 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, United States

David R. Busch

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 3231 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, United States

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Neurology, 3401 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, United States

Shih-Yu Tzeng

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 3231 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, United States

National Cheng Kung University, Department of Photonics, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 701, Taiwan

Rickson C. Mesquita

University of Campinas, Institute of Physics, 777 R. Sergio Buarque de Holanda, Campinas 13083-859, Brazil

Turgut Durduran

ICFO-Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss 3, Castelldefels (Barcelona) 08860, Spain

Joel H. Greenberg

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Neurology, 3450 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, United States

David K. Kung

Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Neurosurgery, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, United States

Neurophoton. 2(3), 035004 (Aug 04, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.NPh.2.3.035004
History: Received May 12, 2015; Accepted July 1, 2015
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Abstract.  We introduce and validate a pressure measurement paradigm that reduces extracerebral contamination from superficial tissues in optical monitoring of cerebral blood flow with diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS). The scheme determines subject-specific contributions of extracerebral and cerebral tissues to the DCS signal by utilizing probe pressure modulation to induce variations in extracerebral blood flow. For analysis, the head is modeled as a two-layer medium and is probed with long and short source-detector separations. Then a combination of pressure modulation and a modified Beer-Lambert law for flow enables experimenters to linearly relate differential DCS signals to cerebral and extracerebral blood flow variation without a priori anatomical information. We demonstrate the algorithm’s ability to isolate cerebral blood flow during a finger-tapping task and during graded scalp ischemia in healthy adults. Finally, we adapt the pressure modulation algorithm to ameliorate extracerebral contamination in monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation and blood volume by near-infrared spectroscopy.

Figures in this Article
© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Wesley B. Baker ; Ashwin B. Parthasarathy ; Tiffany S. Ko ; David R. Busch ; Kenneth Abramson, et al.
"Pressure modulation algorithm to separate cerebral hemodynamic signals from extracerebral artifacts", Neurophoton. 2(3), 035004 (Aug 04, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.NPh.2.3.035004


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