Research Papers

How short is short? Optimum source–detector distance for short-separation channels in functional near-infrared spectroscopy

[+] Author Affiliations
Sabrina Brigadoi, Robert J. Cooper

University College London, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom

Neurophoton. 2(2), 025005 (May 26, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.NPh.2.2.025005
History: Received March 2, 2015; Accepted May 1, 2015
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Abstract.  In recent years, it has been demonstrated that using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) channels with short separations to explicitly sample extra-cerebral tissues can provide a significant improvement in the accuracy and reliability of fNIRS measurements. The aim of these short-separation channels is to measure the same superficial hemodynamics observed by standard fNIRS channels while also being insensitive to the brain. We use Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport in anatomically informed multilayer models to determine the optimum source–detector distance for short-separation channels in adult and newborn populations. We present a look-up plot that provides (for an acceptable value of short-separation channel brain sensitivity relative to standard channel brain sensitivity) the optimum short-separation distance. Though values vary across the scalp, when the acceptable ratio of the short-separation channel brain sensitivity to standard channel brain sensitivity is set at 5%, the optimum short-separation distance is 8.4 mm in the typical adult and 2.15 mm in the term-age infant.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Sabrina Brigadoi and Robert J. Cooper
"How short is short? Optimum source–detector distance for short-separation channels in functional near-infrared spectroscopy", Neurophoton. 2(2), 025005 (May 26, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.NPh.2.2.025005


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